Transport Layer

2697
Transport Layer
Transport Layer

Residing between the application and network layers, the transport layer is the most important part of the layered network architecture. It has the critical role of providing communication services directly to the application processes running on different hosts. The pedagogic

Tags network layer, transport layer, internet protocol, end system, transmission rate, logical communication, segments
1381
Overview of the Transport Layer in the Internet
Overview of the Transport Layer in the Internet

Recollect that the internet, and more commonly a TCP/IP network, makes available two distinct transport-layer protocols to the application layer. One of these protocols is UDP (User Datagram Protocol), which provides an unreliable, connectionless service to the invoking

Tags application layer, udp, tcp, network application, sockets, datagram, packets, segments
6117
Multiplexing and Demultiplexing
Multiplexing and Demultiplexing

In this section we discuss transport-layer multiplexing and demultiplexing, that is, extending the host-to-host delivery service provided by the network layer to a process-to-process delivery service for applications running on the hosts. In order to keep the discussion concrete, we'll

Tags network layer, host, transport layer, socket, application protocol
6548
Connection-Oriented Multiplexing and Demultiplexing
Connection-Oriented Multiplexing and Demultiplexing

To understand TCP demultiplexing, we have to study TCP sockets and TCP connection establishment. One slight difference between a TCP socket and a UDP socket is that a TCP socket is identified by a four-tuple: (source IP address, source port number, destination IP address,

Tags tcp sockets, udp socket, host, segments
4074
Connectionless Transport: UDP
Connectionless Transport: UDP

In this section, we'll examine UDP, how it works, and what it does. We encourage you to refer back to Principles of Network Applications, which contains an overview of the UDP service model, and to Socket Programming with UDP, which discusses socket programming using

Tags socket programming, udp, network layer, application process, end system, tcp, segment
3071
UDP Segment Structure
UDP Segment Structure

The application data shown in Figure 1 occupies the data field of the UDP segment. For instance, for DNS, the data field includes either a query message or a response message. For a streaming audio application, audio samples fill the data field. The UDP header has only four

Tags application data, query message, response message, end system, checksum, udp segment
2088
Principles of Reliable Data Transfer
Principles of Reliable Data Transfer

In this section, we look at the problem of reliable data transfer in a general context. This is appropriate since the problem of implementing reliable data transfer takes place not only at the transport layer, but also at the link layer and the application layer as well. The common

Tags data transfer, transport layer, link layer, application layer, unidirectional data transfer
5138
Building a Reliable Data Transfer Protocol
Building a Reliable Data Transfer Protocol

We first examine the simplest case, in which the underlying channel is completely reliable. The protocol itself, which we'll call rdt1.0, is trivial. The finite-state machine (FSM) definitions for the rdt1.0 sender and receiver are shown in Figure 1. The FSM in Figure 1(a) defines the

Tags protocol, fsm, arq, data packet, countdown timer, checksums, data transfer, transport layer
5543
Pipelined Reliable Data Transfer Protocols
Pipelined Reliable Data Transfer Protocols

Protocol rdt3.0 is a functionally correct protocol, but it is doubtful that anyone would be happy with its performance, especially in todays high-speed networks. At the heart of rdt.3.0s performance problem is the fact that it is a stop-and-wait protocol.

Tags protocol, propagation delay, end systems, routers, data packet
7994
Go-Back-N (GBN)
Go-Back-N (GBN)

In a Go-Back-N (GBN) protocol, the sender is allowed to transmit several packets (when available) without waiting for an acknowledgment, but is constrained to have no more than some maximum allowable number, N, of unacknowledged packets in the pipeline. We describe the

Tags packets, gbn protocol, variables, semaphore, checksums
Page 1 of 3 Previous 1 2 3 Next

Copy Right

The contents available on this website are copyrighted by TechPlus unless otherwise indicated. All rights are reserved by TechPlus, and content may not be reproduced, published, or transferred in any form or by any means, except with the prior written permission of TechPlus.